Oct 23

Chad’s Choices

It’s time for another edition of Chad’s Choices is back! Below are a few articles and blog posts I’ve come across recently that made me think, wonder, and learn. If you haven’t seen these, I’ve included a snippet from the article to pique your interest.

 

 

I don’t think we give students a voice enough. How many times have your students had the opportunity to share their learning or their thoughts? Who do they share with? I’m guessing the sharing that’s going on isn’t to a very wide audience. Here’s are some quick ways to give your students a voice – #10 is the best.

10.  Give them trust.

I think we fear that students will say stupid things (they might).  I think we fear that students will make a fool out of themselves (they wont).  I think we have so many fears when it comes to giving students a voice that we often don’t even try it because we know all of the things that can go wrong.

Read the entire article here.

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I believe many teachers are hesitant to video record themselves teaching. For a variety of reasons, I think this idea scares teachers. Sharing that video is probably even more scary for teachers if the video is going to be used as an evaluation. However, a recent study reveals the a majority of teachers support this idea. What do you think are the benefits?

76% of teachers said they would be open to selecting and submitting videos of their teaching for use in a formal observation or evaluation.

Read the entire article here.

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I’m a fan of infographics. They’re a fun, yet compelling way to share data and information. The infographic below isn’t exactly new, but it it’s a great refresher about habits that highly effective habits of teachers who use technology.

They share, share, and then share some more

 

The-7-Habits-of-Highly-Effective-Teachers-Who-Use-Educational-Technology-Infographic
Click on the infographic to see it in full size.

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Are teachers really better at using tech than “digital natives?” First of all, I don’t like the term digital natives at all, but that’s besides the point. A belief exists that kids are better at using tech than many teachers and that teachers can often learn from their students when it comes to a new device or app. I certainly agree that teachers can and should learn from their students whenever possible, but this article was a little surprising.

It’s time to give up the notion that “digital natives” are more tech savvy than their teachers. According to a recent study of middle school science students and teachers, the teachers tended to have greater technology use.

Read the entire article here.

 

 

 

 

Oct 18

Twitter Favorites (weekly)

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Oct 13

Chad’s Choices

Chad’s Choices is back! For over a year, I shared a variety of articles via the DEN Blogs. I’m now moving Chad’s Choices here. Below are a few articles and blog posts I’ve come across recently that made me think, wonder, and learn. If you haven’t seen these, I’ve included a short part of the article to pique your interest.

 

Have you ever thought of putting yourself in your students’ shoes for a day? What would it be like? Well, one veteran teacher did just that in a high school recently and it has changed his perspective tremendously. Perhaps more teachers should do this.

I waited fourteen years to do something that I should have done my first year of teaching: shadow a student for a day. It was so eye-opening that I wish I could go back to every class of students I ever had right now and change a minimum of ten things – the layout, the lesson plan, the checks for understanding. Most of it!

Read the entire article here.

 

Are you a Twitter user? Have you participated in a Twitter Chat? Twitter chats are a great way to get connected, join the conversation, and learn. If you’re not a Twitter user, this may be a way to get connected. October is Connected Educator Month and this article gives some insight into how Twitter Chats can benefit you as an educator.

If I only could tell myself then what I know now.  Joining Twitter that day has truly impacted my life in the long run….I credit my Professional Learning Network (PLN) with my professional accomplishments.  I learn, discuss, engage, and grow in so many areas of my professional life due to the engagement on Twitter.  It is immeasurable.

Read the entire article here.

 

What’s it like to be a student today? The infographic below shows some very interesting statistics about the view of the youth experience in America. (Click on the image to view the original image)

 

Student View

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What do you think of ebooks? Are books kids read on an iPad or some other device good for students or is the time simply “screen time.” While this article focuses on toddlers, I think it has impact for elementary schools as well.

There’s the possibility for e-books to become the TV babysitters of this generation,” he said. “We don’t want parents to say, ‘There’s no reason for me to sit here and turn pages and tell my child how to read the word, because my iPad can do it.’

 Read the entire article here.

 

 

 

Oct 11

Twitter Favorites (weekly)

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Oct 04

Twitter Favorites (weekly)

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Sep 16

Our Dot Day Activities

Today was a very fun day in the library. We started celebrating Dot Day today and I had 4 classes, grades one through four today. Here’s what we did.

First Grade – After watching the archived livestream of Peter H. Reynolds reading The Dot, an event I was fortunate enough to be a part of in 2012, students used the Paint program on the computers to create their own dot. One of the cool things about the computers we have in our lab is that they are touch screens. This made drawing and coloring the dots much easier for the younger students, compared to using the mouse. We saved their dots and I’ll be putting together a slide show of their work soon. The dots were printed out, the students signed them of course, and they took them home.

photo 1 photo 2

 

photoSecond Grade – These students did the same thing as first grade, but actually had another option for drawing their dots – they had the option of using a stylus for their drawings. If you’re wondering why the first graders didn’t have this option, it’s because I didn’t know we had them. They are actually hidden in the monitors and a fellow library media specialist told me about them. These students had the option of using the mouse, their fingers, or the stylus for their dot drawings.

 

 

 

 

Third Grade – These students actually started their projects in art class about a week ago. The art teacher was working on watercolor paintings with the kids and after talking with him and telling him about Dot Day, he agreed to have the students paint their dots in art. When the students came to class today, they watched the reading of The Dot, and then went to work with their watercolor dots. The dots were very cool, but I decided to have the students create new dots with the help of their classmates. The kids cut out their dots and cut them into fourths (a little math lesson tossed in). Students kept one fourth of their original dot and then placed the rest on a table. Every student then went to the table and picked out 3 other pieces to complete their new dot. Then, they glued everything together, creating a new, collaborative dot. One of the best parts of this project was hearing a student say “We’re doing art in the library!”

photo 3 (1) photo 3 (2) photo 5

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fourth Grade – After watching the reading of the story, fourth graders grabbed their markers and were told to color their dot on a special piece of paper. They didn’t realize their dots would be coming to life. Using the colAR app, students were able to use an iPad or iPod Touch to spin and rotate. They loved this and many even decided to create a second or third dot. They were excited to go home and download the app and show their parents.

photo 4 (1) photo 3 (3) photo 2 (2) photo 1 (3)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Overall, it was a great day. More classes will be doing similar activities in the coming days, but the kids loved it, as did I.

 

Sep 06

Twitter Favorites (weekly)

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Aug 30

Twitter Favorites (weekly)

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Aug 23

Twitter Favorites (weekly)

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Aug 16

Twitter Favorites (weekly)

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

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