Apr 16

iCab Mobile & Green Screen Apps

A couple of days ago, my friend Dave posted a question on Facebook looking for an answer to a problem he was having.  The task involved downloading a video from Discovery Education using the iCab Mobile browser and saving it onto an iPad. The next step would be to use that video as part of a green screen project using another app, Green Screen, by DoInk.  I was able to help solve the problem and the steps are below. Thanks to Dave for helping out with this.

Follow the steps below to download the video to your device.

1. Launch iCab Mobile
2. Log in to your Discovery Ed account (if the video you want is there)
3. Search for and play the video
4. Tap and hold on the video
5. Select Download
6. In the upper right corner of iCab, tap on the circle with the down arrow. That will open the iCab download window
7. Double tap on the file you want to save to your iPad
8. Select “Save File in Album” from the menu.

At this point, the video should be saved to your camera roll on your iPad. From this point, you can launch the Green Screen app, import the video and create your green screen project with the video playing in the background.

Below is a screen cast showing the process.

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Apr 11

Twitter Favorites (weekly)

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

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Mar 28

Twitter Favorites (weekly)

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Mar 25

Chad’s Choices

It’s the middle of March and a time to share a few more articles and blog posts I’ve come across that made me think, wonder, and learn. If you haven’t seen these, I’ve included a snippet from the article to pique your interest.

Homework. Should it exist? How much is too much? My two kids attend different schools – a public school and a private school. One is a middle schooler and one in high school. The amount of homework differs drastically. I have many thoughts about homework – from a parent perspective and a teacher perspective, but agree that in many cases, that homework should probably look different for most kids. Below is another interesting article about homework.

Our culture essentially holds kids hostage from early morning until late afternoon, to a great extent neglecting their need for true socialization, physical activity, play, quality time with parents, and for daydreaming and other creative pursuits. And these days, because academic achievement is held in such high esteem, our culture is intruding further and further onto the little time children once had for that “other stuff.” Because, heaven forbid, children should have no time when they’re not “learning,” kids (in some cases, even those in preschool) are being assigned more homework than ever – expected to continue their academic pursuits even after the school day has ended.

Read the entire article here.

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Reading ability is one of the biggest factors in student achievement. The better readers often get the better grades. I’m sure not I agree with the assessment section, which is listed as of the anchors in this article about using technology to teach reading, but much of the information is pretty solid.

…the teaching profession is one of innovation, and teachers are ceaselessly experimenting with ways to use innovative practice to help kids learn how to read. Recently, I’ve learned that some teachers are even using games to teach reading, arguing that these interactive video games provide the same skills that students need to be able to read.

Read the entire article here.

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Finland isn’t going to teach subjects anymore. Say what? This country is often seen as having one of the best educational systems in the world and they are making a big change. I love this idea because it’s so easy to bring in a variety of subjects into a lesson, something many elementary teachers do on a regular basis. For high school teachers, this is a much bigger change. It’s one I think secondary teachers in the United States would have a very difficult time dealing with.

Subject-specific lessons – an hour of history in the morning, an hour of geography in the afternoon – are already being phased out for 16-year-olds in the city’s upper schools. They are being replaced by what the Finns call “phenomenon” teaching – or teaching by topic. For instance, a teenager studying a vocational course might take “cafeteria services” lessons, which would include elements of maths, languages (to help serve foreign customers), writing skills and communication skills.

Read the entire article here.

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Digital Learning Day was a couple of weeks ago and one of the ideas behind this is to highlight examples of how great teaching, combined with effective technology, are positively impacting America’s schools.happening in schools. I’d argue this should be occurring every day of the year, not just on Digital Learning Day. A blog post by Steve Anderson shared that being digital isn’t just about the technology. He shares several great thoughts.

But I believe being Digital or using Digital Tools is more than just giving devices to kids or even providing professional development for teachers. For me it’s really less about technology and more about relationships and attitudes.

Read the entire article here.

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Mar 21

Twitter Favorites (weekly)

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

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Mar 14

Twitter Favorites (weekly)

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Mar 12

Using a Green Screen

Here’s a recap of some of the stuff that we’ve done at school using a green screen. It’s really been a lot of fun and I hope students and teachers think of this as ONE way students can share their learning with the world. Using a green screen can be as simple as using the Green Screen by DoInk iOS app or more complicated using iMovie or WeVideo. I think the possibilities are endless and it provides students a fun opportunity to show their creativity.

 

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Mar 07

Twitter Favorites (weekly)

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Mar 05

Google Drive Integration

Pics4LearningMy students have been using Google apps when they’ve come to my class in the computer lab. I love the ease of use, the fact that work is saved automatically, and that all of the student work is in one place. The idea that students can access it from whatever device they want, from wherever they want, is icing on the cake.

I discovered something this week that I don’t recall seeing and really loved.

My second graders are making an animal alphabet book using Google Slides. They are researching their facts using Pebble Go and adding their info to their slide. In addition, the kids need to add at least one photo as well. I decided to have the kids use Pics4Learning as the first option when searching for an animal image. The site has copyright free images and is very easy to use. I haven’t used the site in a while, but noticed something pretty awesome – the option to save the pictures to Google Drive – see photo on top right.  Rather than saving the image to their computer and uploading it to the slide, the kids could simply save the image straight to their Drive and then insert the image. I loved this and it was so easy for the kids.  No more downloading to the computer, remembering where it was saved, and uploading it to the document.

Unnamed image (3)Saving the images directly to Drive is such an advantage. Knowing where the images are located and having access to them from anywhere is such a plus. I’d love to see more sites offer Google Drive integration and have a Save to Drive button like Pics4Learning, but in the meantime, there is an alternative. If you add the Save to Google Drive Extension to your Chrome browser, you can right click on an image and save it directly to Google Drive. While this isn’t quite as easy as clicking on a button, especially for younger students, it will do the trick.

The more I use Google Apps with students the more I realize how awesome they are. It makes me wonder why more teachers are not using these tools with their students.

 

 

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Feb 28

Twitter Favorites (weekly)

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

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